Preserved beans and black beans

  1. # Karen commented on July 19th, 2006:^ Is Black bean paste same as taucheo or preserved bean paste? I’m from Melbourne and not sure if Lee Kum Kee sauces have any preserved bean paste… or issit similar to Black bean paste?

To answer Karen’s question, I have taken photos of the two types of beans which are lying in my fridge.  They are two very important cooking ingredients, you see.

This is the preserved black beans or what we [tag]Chinese[/tag] call ‘tau see’.  It is made of black beans which are soaked in brine.  I usually bought the Gulong brand.  Avoid buying those in cans or the dry version.  The canned ones are too salty and the dry version’s smell is too overpowering.

Such beans are good when steamed with chicken, garlic and chillies.  It is the same kind of black beans dim sum restaurants use to make the pork ribs.  I dislike the husks so most of the times, I painstakingly remove them before cooking.  Oh ya, remember to soak them in water for a little while to remove the saltiness.

The above brownish looking mess is the preserved soya beans or taucheou.  It is made from soya beans and have a different taste and smell from the black beans.   There are two varieties available, i.e. the beans being chopped up or complete like the above.  There are so many brands so usually, I prefer to go to a Chinese grocer and ask the boss to pick the best brand for me.

This is also very salty so use sparingly.  For this preserved beans, one does not have to wash or soak them or else the gooey texture will be lost.

A little teaspoons of this taucheo in most dishes cooked with dark soya sauce will make it very yummy.  This is one ingredient that is a must in ‘khau yoke’ (steamed pork with yam) along with the red preserved soya bean cake.  (ang tau joo)

The darker brownish glob is the chopped taucheo (yeah, I got both varieties).  The taucheo tends to get dark when stored for a long time.  I think if we continue leaving it to ferment, then we get soya sauce?  Do store the beans in the fridge to avoid getting mouldy.

Post Author: Lilian

Food, travel, recipes. Chinese Malaysian, blogger, photographer and writer.

10 thoughts on “Preserved beans and black beans

    Erina Law

    (July 19, 2006 - 11:15 pm)

    The black beans are good for our blood. Can used that to boil soup with pork ribs too. Put some garlic together. Taste great. What u do is fry beans without using oil. This will allow the beans to give a better aroma when u boil the soup.

    Sooi2

    (July 20, 2006 - 10:39 am)

    the taucheo is excellent with duck too!

    Mia

    (July 20, 2006 - 11:14 am)

    There is another jar of stuff I saw in the grocers. It looks like the reddish preserved taufu. What is this called and how do we use it in cooking?

    Lilian

    (July 20, 2006 - 11:29 am)

    mia – Nam Yue, I think. Here’s a pic and post:
    http://penangfaces.chanlilian.net/2005/05/14/fermented-red-beancurd-fuyi/

    sooi2 – Yeah, it is an excellent cooking ingredients.

    Erina – Tks for sharing. My mom used to boil black beans with ribs/tails during my confinement. Eat until sked of black beans. Hahaha.

    Erina Law

    (July 20, 2006 - 11:56 am)

    Mia, I think is Nam Yue too. The one that Lilian show you is a brand that can be find easily all over the grocery shop. If you are interested, do try out another brand that is packed in a clay – imported from China too. It cost approx RM5 – RM6/bottle. This one had got a very strong smell. When you open it does not smell good – smell like rotten food but when you used to fried your chicken or pork rib……. taste really really GREAT.

    Lilian, no prob. I love food too so, with sharing with people I learn more.

    Karen

    (July 20, 2006 - 12:16 pm)

    Thanks a lot for showing me the pics! At least I know what to get, because the chinese grocer here and my husband are HongKies. I’m banana (speaks canton but no idea how to read chinese), does this “taucheo” called “nam yue” in Canton?

    Lilian

    (July 20, 2006 - 1:08 pm)

    Karen – taucheo is tau cheong (tau = beans, cheong = thick gravy)
    nam yue is totally another ingredients which you can see from my other blog
    But I think this taucheo is more of a Hokkien ingredients so I am not sure you can find them or not in Hongkies grocers.

    Erina Law

    (July 20, 2006 - 7:13 pm)

    Nam Yu – it’s red fermented beans. In hokkien, they called it Nam Ju. Only 2 types of fermented beans. One is yellowish colour and the other one is in red. Still can get Tau Cheong from Hongkies groceries shop. I remember seeing them when I were in HK. The different could be the texture and the taste.

    shooi

    (July 21, 2006 - 10:01 am)

    my colleagues and i love to eat fried beehoon with our own special taucheor sauce (tau cheor + lime juice + chopped chili padi) …yummy! Actually the sauce is good for as a dip, especially for steamboat.

    […] 4 pips garlic, chopped (if you like garlic, use a whole bulb) 1 large tablespoon of preserved black beans (see the picture here) Season with salt, Shao Xiang wine, corn flour and pepper […]

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