Cooking in bulk – Indian curry

If you plan to cook huge quantities, make sure that you have large pots and pans. Otherwise, do not attempt as cooking in bulk is not the same as cooking regular portions. Of course, one may say that she can cooks several rounds. However, it is no fun cooking several rounds as it gets tedious.

I cooked four chicken today. I got the Tesco staff to chop the chicken for me. However, washing four chicken is already so tiring. I tried to remove as much fats from the chicken as possible. However, now when I look at my photo, I notice the yellowish fats still stuck on some of the pieces.

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I rubbed the chicken pieces (totalling 70 pieces altogether) with salt and leave them for while. Then, I washed the pieces thoroughly. The salt will somehow remove some of the slimy stuffs and at the same time, season the chicken pieces. Then, I pour in tumeric powder and garam masala and leave the chicken pieces to season for while.

onions

I blended about 1.5kg of onions. I could use more but I am too lazy to peel them.

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When I blend the onion, I have to use some water. So, what I normally do is to leave the onion blend in the wok to dry up a bit. Then, I added the curry powder (200 grams) and chilli paste (cili boh – 300 grams) to mix into a paste. After that, I added oil and leave them to simmer.

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In another pan, I dry fry the curry leaves, cinnamon sticks, star anise, cloves, cardamons, mustard seeds and whatever spices I have. There is no rule in cooking curry, ok? I just go with the feel. When the spices are popping, I pour them over to the curry paste.

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The secret ingredients to nice curries. Ghee. Use only 2-3 tablespoons for large pot of curries. Otherwise, the smell of the cow will be too strong.

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The end result – Two very large pot of curries. I added pandan leaves and some gula melaka to give it a smooth flavour. I also throw in some green chillies as I have a big packet. I didn’t use coconut milk as I never like coconut milk based curries. I did not put a lot of water as I don’t want my pot to fill to the brim (it will be hard to transport). So, the gravy was just nice.

The curry is not very hot but tastes fine. I have two very discerning tasters (my two older sons) at home so I got them to taste until they are satisfied with the flavour. I dare not make it too spicy as I am cooking for 60 youths who are having a 3-day camp. I don’t want them to end up with toilet run after their first meal. Hahaha.

I believe I shouldn’t provide the detail recipe because if you are cooking for 60 persons, you wouldn’t need recipes to refer to. When cooking in bulk, we just have to go with our instinct. I would have wanted to add potatoes to the curry but there is no more space in the pot. So, I made potato masala. That will be in the next post.

Post Author: Lilian

Food, travel, recipes. Chinese Malaysian, blogger, photographer and writer.

6 thoughts on “Cooking in bulk – Indian curry

    […] chicken. Costs only about RM50. My Indian curry is damn wangi, wei. A few of the Indian moms there smelled it when I brought the two huge pots […]

    Iris

    (September 12, 2008 - 6:33 pm)

    Yummy, I love curry! I am sure it tastes as good as it looks!

    sunflower

    (September 12, 2008 - 7:58 pm)

    Sounds like a Malaysian style indian curry you have there. Some of the malay/ Indian-Malay curries do use evaporated milk rather than coconut milk.

    Huat Koay @ PenangTuaPui

    (September 13, 2008 - 11:14 am)

    those kids are so lucky to have u cook for them…

    do we have any chance of getting one? hee hee

    surferboon

    (September 15, 2008 - 10:39 am)

    At the way you peel the onions, 20% is wasted and the ghee is it from the cow or palm oil. I tried many places to get the ghee made from cow’s milk and no where available. Can use yogurt to substitute coconut milk

    sujend

    (September 16, 2008 - 2:59 am)

    surferboon

    indian ghees are made on MILK not palm oil 🙂

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